Viewing entries tagged
prostate cancer

A No-Nonsense Look at Prostate Cancer Surgery

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A No-Nonsense Look at Prostate Cancer Surgery

Surgery and radiation are the most commonly administered prostate cancer treatments. There are many factors to consider before making a treatment choice. Every man’s prostate cancer case is different, so the same treatment(s) can lead to different outcomes, especially when it comes to side effects. Often, men undergo surgery or radiation (or both) without being...

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When Men with Prostate Cancer Get Prostatitis

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When Men with Prostate Cancer Get Prostatitis

Prostatitis is associated with inflammation (and or neural upregulation or sensitization), and in a few cases, infection of the prostate, causing pain in the prostate and pelvic area along with variable urinary symptoms. Acute bacterial prostatitis is rare, quite severe, relatively simple to diagnose, and quite easy to cure with...

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The UnCancer

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The UnCancer

At the first ever Active Surveillance Convention, a conference I attended back in 2007, many experts openly bemoaned that the word “CANCER” profoundly overstates the significance of Gleason 6 type of prostate cancer. The pathologists at the conference, however, shot down the idea of a name change saying, “Under the microscope it looks like a cancer, so it is cancer.” No one at the conference had    a rebuttal so the proposal for a name change was dropped.

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Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

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Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Proton beam therapy, a form of external beam radiation, has been around for a while but is less commonly utilized than other forms of radiation therapy, which is partly due to availability. Certain properties of protons show potential for a different approach to radiation therapy. This article also considers how implementation of imaging helps improve treatment outcomes. 

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Clinical Trial: Jeff Lee Mobile Apps For Clinical Trials

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Clinical Trial: Jeff Lee Mobile Apps For Clinical Trials

In this blog PCRI presents an interview from our contributing partner, Prostatepedia. 

Mr. Jeff Lee, a mobile technology veteran, develops clinical trial apps for most major pharmaceutical companies. Prostatepedia spoke with him about how mobile technology streamlines the clinical trial experience for both patients and researchers alike. Here is the interview:

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On Stress: Thoughts from Mark & Mia Moyad

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On Stress: Thoughts from Mark & Mia Moyad

Yes, the PCRI Conference is a community or a village of people coming together to share the latest thoughts and ideas on how to deal with prostate cancer. And this, my friends, provides the ultimate calming effect; not only meeting others like you but also empowering each other with more knowledge and friendships and ultimately more solutions and peace of mind.

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2017 MOYAD + SCHOLZ  MID-YEAR UPDATE  RECAP

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2017 MOYAD + SCHOLZ MID-YEAR UPDATE RECAP

The 2017 Moyad + Scholz Mid-Year Update was an incredible and enlightening experience. Conferences hosted by the PCRI are created to provide education, empowerment, and support for all attendees. This year, patients and caregivers came together to learn the most recent, accurate information on prostate cancer, have the opportunity to ask questions directly to speakers, and find a peaceful environment to interact with others who understand their situation.

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Surgery Versus Radiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

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Surgery Versus Radiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Per the NCCN guidelines, the treatment options for High-Risk prostate cancer are surgery, beam radiation, or a combination of beam radiation plus radioactive seeds. Hormonal therapy (with Lupron for example) is usually given along with the radiation for two to three years. But patients certainly wonder if one of these three treatment options is better than the other two. A study published recently in the October 2016 issue New England Journal of Medicine compared surgery and beam radiation prospectively in men with mostly Low-Risk prostate cancer. It showed equivalent survival rates. A prospective study for High-Risk prostate cancer, however, is unavailable. Only retrospective studies are available.

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